1666
03 Aug 14 at 7 pm

fashionsfromhistory:

Ensemble

20th Century 

Manchu People, China

MET

(via fashionofcolour)

fashionsfromhistory:

Ensemble
20th Century 
Manchu People, China
MET
 101100
26 Mar 14 at 6 pm

70s-postmiserablism:

25 year old Chen Yen-hui recreates makeup looks from the Tang dynasty

click here for more Tang dynasty eyebrows!

(Source: 70s-postmiserablisms, via literarysins)

 184
24 Jan 14 at 3 am

Chilkat Blanket

woven by Tlingit woman Anisalaga (Mary Ebbetts Hunt)

1823-1919

Fort Rupert, British Colombia

Height: 117 cm. (46 in.)

Materials include mountain goat fiber and cedar bark fiber

Sources:

http://anisalaga.wordpress.com/2013/08/16/introduction/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilkat_weaving

Chilkat Blanket
woven by Tlingit woman Anisalaga (Mary Ebbetts Hunt)
1823-1919
Fort Rupert, British Colombia
Height: 117 cm. (46 in.)
Materials include mountain goat fiber and cedar bark fiber

Sources:
http://anisalaga.wordpress.com/2013/08/16/introduction/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilkat_weaving
 1752
14 Jan 14 at 12 pm

Minh-Ha T. Pham, “Fraught Intimacies: Fashion & Feminism (The Director’s Cut)” (via vroomheid)

yes.

(via thelingerielesbian)

All this right here definitely applies to bras and bra wearing.

(via thelingerieaddict)

(Source: indigocrayon, via onetothestate)

"In reserving the category of “fashion” exclusively for certain kinds of white Western bourgeois styles of dress and personhood, the fashion elite have hijacked the term. Styles and practices of dress not sanctioned by the fashion elite are relegated to the broad category of “non-fashion,” which includes everything from outdated clothing styles to “ethnic garb.” In this binary logic, “fashion” is the sign of Western modernity, innovation, dynamism, and choice (a point Myers emphasizes so strongly) and non-fashion is the sign of the unmodern, the uninnovative, the static, and the oppressed. People associated with non-fashions like, say “ethnic garb,” are imagined as “traditional” subjects who lag behind or are situated outside of the modern West.

Fashion’s alignment with “the modern” and, tacitly, white American and Western European culture is a foundational fiction of fashion that passes for self-evident truth in too much popular, vernacular, and critical fashion discourse. But fashion isn’t alone in its imperialist claims on “the modern”. This dominant logic of fashion is part and parcel of what Minoo Moallem usefully describes as “civilizational thinking”: “a powerful modern discourse influenced by the Enlightenment and the idea of progress dividing the civility of the ‘West’ from the barbarism of the ‘Rest.’” Hardly an innocent sartorial designation, the logic of “ethnic garb” which places some practices and styles of dress outside of the category of Fashion (and all the positive connotations that accrue to it) has produced devastating material, social, and physical consequences."

 1380
26 Dec 13 at 12 am

mertseger:

Silla, 6th century

From the tombs of Silla period, the internationally unprecedented number of gold earrings was excavated.These earrings were found in Couple’s tombs in Bomun-dong, Gyeongju. They are the most elaborate and magnificent earrings among Silla earrings in that they display elegant taste of Silla and the prime craftsmanship of metal arts of Silla.

(via quietriver-ragingsea)

tags: yes yes 
mertseger:

Silla, 6th centuryFrom the tombs of Silla period, the internationally unprecedented number of gold earrings was excavated.These earrings were found in Couple’s tombs in Bomun-dong, Gyeongju. They are the most elaborate and magnificent earrings among Silla earrings in that they display elegant taste of Silla and the prime craftsmanship of metal arts of Silla.
 228
06 Dec 13 at 12 pm

Lace-like beaded necklace
19th century
Zulu, Southern Africa
Field Museum

Lace-like beaded necklace 19th century Zulu, Southern AfricaField Museum
 148
12 Nov 13 at 3 pm

Woman’s ceremonial skirt (kain kebat), early 20th century

Indonesia (Upper Kapuas River, West Kalimantan, Borneo); Kantu’ people

Cotton

18 1/4 x 46 1/2 in. (46.4 x 118.1 cm)

Purchase, The Fred and Rita Richman Foundation Gift, 2006 (2006.349)

NOT ON VIEW   Last Updated April 26, 2013

The intricately patterned skirts, or kain kebat, of the Kantu’ people of Borneo are luxurious ceremonial garments. Kain kebat are worn as formal attire by women on important occasions, especially while performing ritual activities such as setting out food offerings for the gods and spirits or dyeing the threads for weaving textiles. Weavers among the Kantu’ and neighboring peoples create two primary forms of ritual textiles: kain kebat and pua. Pua are ceremonial cloths used in a variety of religious rites. The patterns of the pua cloths are said to be so supernaturally powerful that they will make a woman ill if she weaves them continuously. Weavers thus regularly alternate between making pua and less dangerous but equally magnificent skirts and other garments.

The compositions of most Indonesian textiles are strictly symmetrical. Weavers of kain kebat often introduce a slight asymmetry that accentuates the vigor of their patterns. Many of the motifs and patterns on the skirts are named after the plants and animals of the surrounding rainforests and rivers, although their precise significance remains uncertain. The complex curvilinear compositions at times resemble those on ancient pottery from Borneo as well as Bronze Age objects imported centuries ago from the Southeast Asian mainland.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

 3643
19 Oct 13 at 11 pm

cultureincart:

Politics of Men’s Hair in Chinese history

cultureincart

(via maibeitsmayberlline)

cultureincart:

Politics of Men’s Hair in Chinese history
cultureincart
 3726
12 Oct 13 at 11 pm

universalbeauty:

Vintage photo of Nepalese woman, 1910 (source)

(Source: , via fuckyeahhistorycrushes)

universalbeauty:

Vintage photo of Nepalese woman, 1910 (source)